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Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat

Text of Book

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 1

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 2

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 3

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 4

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Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 6

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 7

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 8

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 9

Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 10

Questions

1) Which is the main idea of this chapter?

2) Which two sentences best develop the theme of nature versus man?

3) What is the "long and narrow oblong box" the men are transporting?

4) How does the silence of the landscape impact the men early in the chapter?

5) Bill "reiterates" to Henry that they only have six dogs.

What does "reiterates" mean in this chapter?

6) What is the significance of Bill thinking he was one fish short when he fed the dogs?

7) What does the fire most strongly symbolize in this chapter?

8) Why don't the men just shoot the animals that are creating the danger?

9) At the end of the chapter, how many sled dogs are left?

10) Were there any words that weren't clear to you?

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Question #2

Which two details cause the men to decide the animal disrupting their campsite must be tamer than normal?

It has a color that is unusual for a wolf.

It is not as afraid of fire as it should be.

It takes food from Bill's hand during feeding time.

It follows the men more and more closely over time.

It is smart enough to act as a decoy for the pack of wolves.

It is able to figure out how to get the dogs out of their leather thongs.

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Part I– Chapter 1: The Trail of the Meat, page 7

Table of Contents

"Henry, it's a blame misfortune to be out of ammunition."

Bill had finished his pipe and was helping his companion to spread the bed of fur and blanket upon the spruce boughs which he had laid over the snow before supper. Henry grunted, and began unlacing his moccasins.

"How many cartridges did you say you had left?" he asked.

"Three," came the answer. "An' I wisht 'twas three hundred. Then I'd show 'em what for, damn 'em!"

He shook his fist angrily at the gleaming eyes, and began securely to prop his moccasins before the fire.

"An' I wisht this cold snap'd break," he went on. "It's ben fifty below for two weeks now. An' I wisht I'd never started on this trip, Henry. I don't like the looks of it. I don't feel right, somehow. An' while I'm wishin', I wisht the trip was over an' done with, an' you an' me a–sittin' by the fire in Fort McGurry just about now an' playing cribbage––that's what I wisht."

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Part I– Chapter 2: The She-Wolf, page 0

Table of Contents

Breakfast eaten and the slim camp–outfit lashed to the sled, the men turned their backs on the cheery fire and launched out into the darkness. At once began to rise the cries that were fiercely sad––cries that called through the darkness and cold to one another and answered back. Conversation ceased. Daylight came at nine o'clock. At midday the sky to the south warmed to rose–colour, and marked where the bulge of the earth intervened between the meridian sun and the northern world. But the rose–colour swiftly faded. The grey light of day that remained lasted until three o'clock, when it, too, faded, and the pall of the Arctic night descended upon the lone and silent land.

As darkness came on, the hunting–cries to right and left and rear drew closer––so close that more than once they sent surges of fear through the toiling dogs, throwing them into short–lived panics.

At the conclusion of one such panic, when he and Henry had got the dogs back in the traces, Bill said:

"I wisht they'd strike game somewheres, an' go away an' leave us alone."

"They do get on the nerves horrible," Henry sympathised.